CHY 4U 2011: The Trial of Nevile Chamberlain

History can be cruel to politicians. Despite early attempts to stabilize Europe, former British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain is remembered for one infamous moment: in 1938, he held up an agreement that he and Adolf Hitler had signed, and proudly announced to the British public that he had brought them “peace in our time.” Less than a year later, Germany invaded Poland.

Today, we will put Chamberlain on trial. The charge is the following:

The defendant, Neville Chamberlain, is charged with using poor judgement unbefitting a world leader, and failing to prevent war.

 The Roles:

2 Judges, who must consult the Catechism and other sources to learn about leadership and judgement

Sections

 

The
Defense

 

The
Prosecution

 

The
Witnesses

 

The
Jury of Bad Decisions and Silly Mistakes

 Roles 3 lawyers (each lawyer is responsible for asking questions to one of the
witnesses) 
3 lawyers (each lawyer is responsible for asking questions to one of the
witnesses) 
Neville ChamberlainAdolf Hitler

Joseph Stalin

Winston Churchill

 

Commodus (gladiatorial fights)General George McClellan(Antietam)

Duke Medina-Sedonia (Armada)

Christopher Columbus (Manatees)

 

Duties Develop a strategy for gaining the decision you seek.Create a series of questions for each witness.

Interview each witness independently for 5 minutes to prepare for the trial.

Develop a strategy for gaining the decision you seek.Create a series of questions for each witness.

Interview each witness independently for 5 minutes to prepare for the trial.

Learn
your figure’s role in pre-war and wartime EuropeParticipate in a 5 minute interview with members of both teams to develop a better understanding of the questions that will be asked.
Quickly discover the nature of your bad decision (you need to explain this when
giving your verdict)Sit in on the questioning of one witness. Make notes, but do not participate! Be as
secretive as possible. 

• You will have 40 minutes to familiarize yourself with the basic events of the period, and to shape this information so that it helps you play your role. You must start with the textbook’s explanation of the Munich Agreement. Do this in large groups (defense, prosecution, witnesses, and jury)
• You will have 10 minutes to prepare your questions, or to anticipate the questions of others. Remember that you need to ask questions that will get you what you want; thus, you need to create questions tailored to the witness!
• You will have 10 minutes of interviews.

• The trial will take place tomorrow.

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